NutriSales

Project aims and design

The primary aim of the NutriSales project is to monitor trends in food purchases, availability, and nutrient quality of the national food supply in New Zealand.  Annual store surveys are used to collect food availability and composition data for the Nutritrack database.  Each year barcode, package, labelling, ingredient and nutritional information are collected for ~14,000 unique packaged food products and non-alcoholic beverages on sale at four major supermarket retailers: Countdown, Pak N Save, New World, and 4Square.  A bespoke smartphone app is used to take photographs of all packaged products on sale.  Product and nutrient data are also collected from in-store and on-line from all major fast food chains.  Availability and nutrient composition information are linked with food purchase data from the Nielsen Homescan panel, a nationally representative consumer panel of ~2,500 households whose member scan all grocery items brought into the home for consumption.

 

 

 

The NutriSales project includes six primary analyses with the following objectives.

 

Objectives for packaged supermarket foods:

(1)  To determine the mean sodium, saturated fat, and total sugar content of New Zealand packaged foods, overall and by food category i.e. population nutrient exposure

Secondary objectives: 

I.  To identify categories of packaged foods where reduction of sodium, saturated fat, and total sugar is likely to lead to the biggest health gains.

II.  To compare estimates of nutrient exposure from a store survey with those weighted by household food purchases.

(2)  To compare the mean sodium, saturated fat, total sugar, and nutrient profile of New Zealand packaged foods over time (7 years; 2011 to 2017), overall and by food category.

Secondary objectives:

 I.  To compare the availability of major New Zealand packaged foods over time (2011 to 2017)

 II.  To compare population purchases of major New Zealand packaged foods over time (2011 to 2017)

(3)  To compare the mean total and added sugar content of packaged foods available for sale in similar countries (New Zealand, Australia, UK, US), overall and by important food categories.

Secondary objective:

I.  To use epidemiological macro simulation modelling to predict the total population health and mortality impacts (DALYs) of reducing serving sizes of single-serve sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) available for sale in NZ supermarkets and fast food outlets**.

 

Objectives for fast foods:

(4)  To compare the mean sodium, saturated fat, and total sugar and serving size of major categories of New Zealand fast food over five years (2011 to 2015).

Secondary objectives: 

 I.  To compare the availability of major categories of fast food over five years (2011 to 2015).

 II.  To use epidemiological macro simulation modelling to predict the total population morbidity and mortality impacts (DALYs) of reformulation to reduce the sodium, saturated fat, and total sugar, and serving size of major New Zealand fast foods.

 

Objectives for packaged supermarket and fast foods combined**

(5)  To predict the reductions required in the mean sodium content of New Zealand packaged and restaurant foods, and discretionary salt intake, to reduce population sodium intake from the current 3,360mg towards the World Health Organization (WHO) target of 2,000mg/day.

 Secondary objective: 

 I.  To use epidemiological macro simulation modelling to predict the total population morbidity and mortality impacts (Disability Adjusted Life Years; DALYs) of reducing the sodium content of the NZ diet as outlined above.

 

Objectives using dietary intake data:

(6)   To determine dietary patterns associated with meeting the WHO 10% and 5% of total energy added sugar guideline.

Secondary objective:

 I.  To use epidemiological macro simulation modelling to predict the total population morbidity and mortality impacts (DALYS) of meeting the WHO 10% and 5% of total energy added sugar guideline1.

 

NutriSales is a five-year project that runs from 2013 to 2018.

 

Project progress

Project Progress

 

Lead researcher

NutriSales is led by Dr Helen Eyles at the National Institute for Health Innovation.

Photo of Helen Eyles